Microsoft PowerPivot for Excel and SharePoint

As you may already know from some of the tweets concerning #PowerPivot, the book Microsoft PowerPivot for Excel and SharePoint is now available at Amazon.com.  The book’s authors are Sivakumar Harinath, Ron Pihlgren, and Denny Guang-Yeu Lee (i.e. myself).  Siva and Ron are both long time (this is a good thing) testers with the Analysis Services team.  And myself, well – you already know who I am (just in case you don’t, I’m with SQLCAT specializing in Analysis Services and PowerPivot). This is an end-to-end book describing all of the moving parts within PowerPivot.  It is written in difficulty order…

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Win a signed PowerPivot Architecture Technical Diagram at TechEd NA 2010

There are many reasons to go to TechEd North America 2010 in New Orleans this year.  After all, it is THE event for developers and IT Professionals.  And if you want to know more about PowerPivot, here’s yet another reason why you need to go. There will be a raffle to win a signed copy of the PowerPivot Architecture Technical Diagram (screenshot below) in each of five PowerPivot sessions (five diagrams in total). The sessions are: BIE04-INT – Building Custom Extensions to the PowerPivot Management Dashboard (Mon 6/7 1:00pm-2:15pm, Room 241) BIC06-INT – SQLCAT: PowerPivot Best Practices and Enterprise Case…

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Delegation, Claims, Active Directory….Again?! Frak!

As you may have noted in my original posting Delegation, Claims, Active Directory…Oh My!…Aw Crap!, it quickly described how to solve issues surrounding the delegation of the claims token within an Active Directory environment.  In it I referenced Lee Graber’s excellent posting: The data connection uses Windows Authentication and user credentials could not be delegated. Today Lee had followed up with his new posting Testing the Claims To Windows Token Service for different identities which is an important read because: It includes the full script of the how to test the whether different identities can work properly within the c2wts…

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Hierarchies, Oh Hierarchies…where are thou? (in PowerPivot)

I had a great question from a customer concerning something weird happening with PowerPivot relationships.  In this example, we have two tables such as city and state. State Mapping Table City-State Mapping Table With the City-State mapping table, it is apparent that the cities of Boston, Quincy, Norwood belong to MA while Seattle and Redmond belong to WA.  Even though the relationship makes sense (as per below) the output doesn’t!   I wish we had hierarchies! Alas, one of the biggest wishes in PowerPivot was that we had in hierarchies and we just were not able to put them in. …

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PowerPivot Technical Diagram: PowerPivot Client/Server Architecture

Because PowerPivot for Excel and PowerPivot for SharePoint involve many components from SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services, Office 2010, and SharePoint 2010, this poster contains all of the key components that make up PowerPivot in one view. This view includes nearly all of the logical architecture components and illustrates how these componets work together. Included in this diagram are the components for: PowerPivot for Excel PowerPivot for SharePoint Browser-Based Clients and their connection to PowerPivot Data Import and Data Providers in relation to PowerPivot Analysis Services Clients and their ability to connect to PowerPivot Timer Jobs, Health and Usage…

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Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 PowerPivot Planning and Deployment

What’s great about the newly published “Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 PowerPivot Planning and Deployment” is that it is a guide that has the end-to-end architecture design of PowerPivot for Excel and PowerPivot for SharePoint including hardware requirements, topologies, and deployment planning. If you want to know more about PowerPivot Planning and Deployment – this is the document.   You can find the Microsoft SQL Server PowerPivot Planning and Deployment on SQLCAT and TechNet. Enjoy!

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Dude, Where’s my PowerPivot workbook?

In homage to Rob Collie’s blog posting style (yes!…he has style, he has grace, …) and of course the movie “Dude, Where’s my Car?”, let’s ask a new question: Dude, where’s my PowerPivot workbook? And before you ask, we’re not talking about searching for the workbook somewhere in your “My Documents” folder, USB drive or SkyDrive.  What we’re referring to here is the fact that you went ahead and saved your PowerPivot workbook to the SharePoint, typically through the Excel Save As or Save to SharePoint function as noted in the posting: Uploading #PowerPivot for Excel workbook using “Save As”…

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Delegation, Claims, Active Directory…Oh My!…Aw Crap!

Heads up, this posting’s title was “User credentials could not be delegated and Active Directory” but I realized I needed a title that evoked my emotional state  😉 Do not fret or worry, this is not “yet another user credentials delegation” blog. After all, there are already the postings including Troubleshooting #PowerPivot Excel Services connectivity (written by yours truly) and Excel Services delegation (by PowerPivotTwins partner Dave Wickert).   More importantly, if you want to debug and troubleshoot your way through the PowerPivot / Excel Services delegation issues, the coup-de-grace is Lee Graber’s excellent post: that The data connection uses…

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